206 Distillery in Seattle

206 distillery

I had the opportunity to visit 206 Distillery in downtown Seattle recently, who make Counter Gin and Batch 206 Vodka, and got a tour from Rusty Figgins, their master distiller. Rusty let us start with a small (1/2 oz) colder-than-freezing taste of their vodka, which was good but not particularly different for other mid-range vodkas I’ve tried.  After my palate was cleared, I had an ice-cold sip of their gin.

Rusty then showed us the distilling chambers and some of the new projects they’re working on, which were aging in barrels at the time (hint: whiskey and brandy) and let us see the clean red wheat that their vodka is distilled from.

206 distillery

All in all, it was a fun day, and Rusty is a lot of fun to hang out with. I bought a bottle of Counter Gin for $25, and it’s been well worth it. The gin is great, a good strong taste, very botanical. Rusty showed me the various botanics that go into the gin as part of the tour. To give it a review, it’s got plenty of juniper flavor and some burn, and I’d call it a gin-lover’s gin, which is to say it’s not as smooth and friendly as Hendrick’s is to the common man.

Homemade Cocktail Cherries

I have an aversion to high fructose corn syrup. I began avoiding it 4 years ago and lost a bunch of weight as a result.  One of the final hurdles for my HFCS-avoidance is maraschino cherries.  The jars of cherries at the store contain pitted cherries, red dye, and HFCS.  I’ve been looking for alternatives, and found a simple recipe to make your own.

Homemade Cocktail Cherries

Combine:

  • Trader Joe’s Dried Bing Cherries (these are pitted too).
  • Brandy of your choosing.  I used Pierre Duchene, which is $8 at Trader Joe’s.
  • A container.

Combine them so that the cherries are completely submerged, and leave some room because they’ll swell quite a bit.

brandy cherries submerged

Ew….but leave them in there for 2 days minimum, and here’s what you get:

brandy cherries plumped

Wow! I had to top it off again with brandy as they really swelled up on me.  Now the result is a firm cherry, not sweet at all (I’m considering using a little sugar in the jar next time).  I’ve used them in Old Fashioneds and they come out great!

The Gibson

Gibson cocktail

This is a great opportunity to use your smaller glassware…the “classic” stuff.

Gibson

  • 2 oz. gin
  • a splash of dry vermouth
  • garnish with a cocktail onion

Some suggest that you simply wave the vermouth bottle over the glass, making for a truly dry drink (i.e. straight gin), I go with a little splash though.  Shake or stir with lots of ice until freezing cold with a nice layer of ice on top, strain into a 2 1/2 oz cocktail glass and drink immediately.

As I noted with a martini before, put ice water in the empty glass while you’re mixing – it gets the glass just as cold as freezing it would, but it’s much easier.  The key to this drink is cold!

Watermelon Wine Margarita

watermelon wine margarita ingredients

This recipe will make about a gallon of margaritas, and is low-alcohol, so it’s great for a party or BBQ.  It also tastes like watermelon Jolly Ranchers!

Get a bottle of White Zinfandel, a bottle of Trader Joe’s margarita mixer, some seedless watermelon, and lots of ice. Here’s how you make them:

  • Puree 4 cups of watermelon in the blender, then stir with:
  • 4 cups (the whole bottle) of Trader Joe’s margarita mixer.
  • 2 cups of White Zinfandel.

Serve the mixture in a pitcher or large beverage dispenser of some sort with LOTS of ice, at least 4 cups or more.  You’ll want the heat of the summer to get a little of the melted ice into the drink and get your dispenser all sweaty and cold.

watermelon wine margarita ingredients

Rim your glasses with salt (pink Himalayan looks particularly cool with this one) and serve on ice.  Nothing like an electric pink beverage on a hot summer’s day!

watermelon wine margarita

Tito’s Martini

tito's vodka martini

“Happiness is a dry martini and a good woman…or a bad woman.” ~George Burns

The martini is the definitive “welcome home” drink from a hard day’s work.  While there’s a tireless debate about gin or vodka, shaken or stirred, wet or dry, I’m going to present one recipe here in order to stay true to the “simple” moniker.  Here’s my favorite vodka martini.

Vodka Martini

  • 2 oz Tito’s Handmade vodka
  • 1/2 oz dry vermouth
  • 1 or more olives to garnish
  • as JB says, “shaken, not stirred”

To chill the cocktail glass, I prefer using ice water (see picture above) while I build the drink.  This is faster and requires less planning than freezing the glass.

White Russian

titos and starbucks white russians

I’ve been working up to this for a while, because it’s a great way to use coffee ice, which I made over several weeks and kept in a gallon bag in the freezer.  Next, I got my favorite vodka, Tito’s Handmade and my second-favorite coffee liqueur, Starbucks (Patron XO Cafe is my favorite by far).  Fill the glass with “coffee ice” and add:

White Russian

  • in a shaker, combine:
  • 1 oz vodka
  • 1 oz coffee liqueur
  • 1 oz cream
  • shake well with ice and strain into an ice-filled old fashioned glass

Mango-Ice Margaritas

mango ice margaritas

This recipe is a minor variation on the margarita for the summertime.  First, puree mangoes with a bit of water and freeze the results in ice trays overnight.  Using the “mango ice” instead of regular ice, build your margarita.

Mango Ice Margarita

  • 1 1/2 oz of tequila
  • 1 oz lime juice
  • 1 oz triple sec
  • on the mango rocks in a salt-rimmed glass
  • no garnish (it distracts from the cool yellow cubes)

Now, recently, I’ve begun doing something to my margaritas that people say has made them even better.  I add 1-2 ox of club soda/seltzer water on top and give it a stir.  It mellows out the pungent nature of tequila and makes a more refreshing drink anyway, and in this one, it helps break down the mango cubes.  You’ll want to let this one sit at the table before your guests start sipping so that the mango can get all sloshy in there.  The mango flavor will be subtle, and not overpowering.

Viola:

mango ice margaritas

Gin Rickey

gin rickey

For several months, a Gin and Tonic has been a good go-to drink for me.  I always get my tonic water at Whole Foods to avoid the high-fructose corn syrup that swims in Schwepp’s.  They have their own 365 Every Day Value brand for $2.50 for a six-pack of bar-friendly cans. Now while I like the flavor of tonic water, I wish I could reduce the sweetness of it.

Tonic water is bubbly water with quinine, citrus, and sugar.  Club soda is bubbly water, nothing more.  Whole Foods has some of that too. I googled club soda, lime, and gin to discover it’s already a common cocktail that I have heard of several times: The Gin Rickey!  Here’s the recipe:

Gin Rickey

  • In a 10-oz glass filled with ice, combine:
  • 1 1/2 oz gin
  • juice of 1/2 to 1 whole lime (I like it with more)
  • top with club soda (about 3-4 ounces)

You’ll end up with a drier, more refreshing, more sour alternative to the Gin & Tonic!  Yum!

Pink Gin

1 1/2 oz gin
3 or more dashes of bitters

Shake with ice, strain into cocktail glass.

About the simplest cocktail out there.  Clearly, you should use good gin and I recommend Angostura or Peychaud’s bitters.

Absolutely Perfect Margarita

margarita

Here’s the recipe:

  • 1 1/2 oz of tequila
  • 1 oz lime juice
  • 1 oz triple sec
  • on the rocks in a salt-rimmed glass
  • lime wedge garnish

So how’s that “perfect?”  The ingredient list is simple, but like I say in the book, quality is the key with all cocktails, so here’s what I used:

Lime juice must be fresh-squeezed.  I used course Himalayan Pink salt to rim the glass because it tastes really good and looks unique.  (Insert joke about manliness here)

hornitos reposado

I used Hornitos Reposado Tequila. A simple lesson in tequila types: blanco tequilas are unaged and so they’re the most pungent.  Reposado tequilas are aged 2-12 months to they are smoother, and anejo tequilas are aged from 1 to 3 years, so they’re smooth, the tequila equivalent to scotch.  Make sure it’s 100% agave tequila – that’s the only kind to use.

Hornitos Reposado is the best tequila I’ve tried so far, compared to Trader Joe’s brand 100% agave and 1800 Blanco.  It’s the smoothest and has the best flavor.

3 ingredients will help you make an absolutely perfect Margarita.  Simple!

Page 54 of 54« First...10203040...5051525354